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Creating Ponds with Liners

Creating Ponds with Liners

Many gardeners begin to consider adding a small pond or water garden in the middle of the summer, which is surprising. If you’re looking for something that doesn’t need to be weeded or watered, a pond is an excellent option.
I prefer the sound of a water fountain or waterfall to that of tending the flower bed or cutting the grass. The best part is that the pond never stops flowering, no matter how hot or rainy it gets!
Putting a concrete pond in may seem like a pipe dream now that it’s 95 degrees outside, but don’t let that stop you from dreaming about one.
Thanks to improved pond liners and pre-formed pools, concrete mixing and finishing are now a thing of the past. There are now 10 year warranties on heavy duty pool liners that retail for less than $1.00 a square foot.
The use of preformed ponds, which come in a variety of forms and sizes, is an alternative to utilizing concrete to build a pond quickly and at a lower cost. An ordinary gardener can build a pond in less than a day using these items and have it filled with plants, fish, and a fountain by the next morning using these supplies.
An above-ground pond is the easiest to create. Since this pond does not involve any excavating, the process of filling it with water frequently takes considerably longer than the process of building it!
A simple illustration of this concept is to construct a rectangular pond using treated wooden planks that are at least 2″ thick and 12″ wide, then nail the planks together to make the required shape. The form may then be placed where the pond will be.
A bottomless “box” may be put on the ground and then covered with some form of padding or cushioning material to protect it from damage. Most literature recommends using sand, but I prefer roofing felt. It’s inexpensive, easy, flat, keeps weeds out, and is a great cushion for the pool liner.
The pool liner may be lowered into the form after the roofing felt is in place, and then the pond can begin to fill with water. You may need to use a few staples to prevent the liner from blowing out of the pond, but be careful to use just a few and arrange them around the perimeter of the pond form.
The weight of the water will help smooth out creases as the pond fills, but if you’re a perfectionist, you may smooth them out by hand before the pond is more than an inch deep. At this point, you may check to see if or not the pond’s form needs to be elevated slightly on one or two sides by placing shims into the pond to raise the forms.
If you’d rather have the pond overflow into a flower bed rather than onto the deck, you may lower the overflow side of the pond by a quarter inch.
Before cutting or permanently stapling any extra liners, wait until the pond is fully filled. As the pond fills, the few staples you used to hold the liner in place may come loose, but if you stapled it near the edges of the form, you won’t be doing any harm, since you’ll be trimming some of the excess liner anyway. This will allow the water pressure to pull the liner into every nook and cranny where it is needed.
In fact, it takes longer to fill this kind of pond than it does to construct one. It took me two hours to build a 20-by-30-foot pond, but it took all night to fill it with water.
For an above-ground pond, I believe the best depth is 14 inches, although it may be deeper or shallower depending on the materials you are utilizing for the form. For pond construction, railroad ties, landscaping timbers, concrete blocks, and so on are all viable options.
If you want your wood to last longer than a year, make sure to pressure treat it! In addition to the rectangular form, you may also create triangular and pentagonal shapes if you have some carpentry abilities.
A stake should be driven into the ground where the boards are nailed together if the pond is longer than 8 feet or 10 feet. If the pond is shorter than 8 feet or 10 feet, the planks do not require any side support. You can make a pond if you know how to nail four boards together with twelve nails. Have the lumberyard trim the boards to your desired length if you’re feeling sluggish. Find those scissors in the kitchen drawer, borrow your neighbor’s staple gun, and you’re good to go!
In-ground ponds may also be constructed using pond liners. You have the flexibility to design whatever pond form you choose, and the earth itself acts as a support for the liner’s sides.
Use a garden hose to lay out the form of the pool you choose. Once everyone agrees on the design and size, you may begin digging by excavating a trench along the hose.
Remember that the depth of the pool does not need to be more than 12 to 16 inches. Soil collected from the excavation site may be used to build waterfalls in the future. Another option for disposing of excavated material is to utilize part of it to build a berm around the pond.
Make sure the pond is level, pick which side you want extra rainwater to flow from, and then begin lining the hole with roofing felt by running it across the pond and up the sides onto its borders. Drop the liner in, put some pebbles around the edges to keep it in place, and begin filling.
Again, wait until the pond is full before trimming any surplus liner. Some literature recommends creating a shallow ledge before installing the liner in the pond, but our river sand and rainfall make this unnecessary. My recommendation is to keep the pond depth between 14 and 16 inches and use bricks to support bog plants that don’t like to sit in water. Because of this, you’ll have more freedom to rearrange the pond plants as you see fit and won’t have to worry about a shelf falling into the water accidentally. In order to prolong the life of your pool liner, keep the exposed edges of the pool shaded from the sun as much as possible.
You may extend the lifespan of your pond liner by using stones or wooden planks to complete the perimeter of your pond. Sod or pavement material should be used to cover the margins of even the heaviest premade plastic ponds. As a last tip, try to situate the water feature as far away from trees as possible, and in an area that receives at least five hours of direct sunlight each day. It allows you to cultivate a variety of aquatic plants in your water garden.
A dechlorinating agent should be used as soon as possible since the new chemicals in our water do not evaporate rapidly and may harm your fish for ten days after you have filled the pond.
You don’t want to be filling your pond and thinking, “I should have built it larger, or longer, or rounder, etc.” within the first two hours.

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